Now Hiring! Paid Summer Internship at Fountain Theatre

Seeking Undergrad College Student for Paid Summer Internship

Know a college student looking for a job this summer? A student who likes theater? Enjoys working in an office? Is bright, organized, good with people, and eager to learn? The Fountain has a job for him/her this summer.
Supported by a grant from the Los Angeles County Arts Commission, the purpose of the internship is to provide an undergraduate student with meaningful on-the-job training and experience in working in nonprofit arts organizations, while assisting arts organizations to develop future arts leaders. Students eligible for the internship position must be currently enrolled undergraduate college students who are residents of and/or attending college in Los Angeles County.
 
Students must have completed at least one semester of college by June 1, 2015 or will complete their undergraduate degree between May 1 – September 1, 2015 in order to be eligible to participate. Students who have already earned a BA, BS or a higher degree are not eligible.
Students who have previously participated in the Los Angeles County Arts Internship Program are not eligible to participate a second time.
2014 Fountain interns Gabby Lamm and Alice Kors

2014 Fountain interns Gabby Lamm and Alice Kors

A 10 week paid summer internship (40 hours/week) starting no earlier than June 1 and ending no later than August 28. Pay is $400 per week.  The Fountain is seeking one intern this summer for Development.
                     
POSITION DESCRIPTION
The Development Intern will work closely with the Director of Development to create and launch new fundraising and grant writing campaigns. The intern will assist in targeting and contacting new funding sources, creating and implementing new fundraising materials, assist in individual contribution programs, and facilitate special events for donors and community partners. Under professional guidance, he/she will learn and develop grant writing skills to create and submit new grant proposals to major foundations. To assist in gathering the data required for specific grant applications. Other duties will include general administrative tasks, basic data base management, computer entry, administrative tasks, word-processing, phone activity, daily interaction with office staff. The Intern will be welcomed into the Fountain Family, requiring a candidate who is interested in joining a team and learning many aspects of running an intimate non-profit theatre.
2013 Fountain intern Lowes Moore

2013 Fountain intern Lowes Moore

SKILLS REQUIRED
The intern candidate must have basic computer and word-processing skills (PC, Word, Excel, Internet), good communication skills and pleasant phone manner, organizational skills, be detail oriented, and have the ability to multi-task in an intimate office environment. A sense of humor and a willingness to learn many aspects of theatre management. S/he should be self-motivated and have the ability to take initiative when required. S/he should also have a passion for theater. Excellent writing and editing skills. An ability to work effectively both independently and cooperatively. Creativity, enthusiasm for learning, and an outgoing, friendly demeanor.
 
HOW TO APPLY
Please email cover letter and resume to Barbara Goodhill, Director of Development, at barbara@fountaintheatre.com.
Deadline to apply: May 1st, 2015
The Fountain Theatre thanks the Los Angeles County Arts Commission and the LA County Board of Supervisors for supporting the 2015 Los Angeles County Arts Internship Program.

 

 

Meet ‘I And You’ Playwright Lauren Gunderson

Lauren Gunderson

Lauren Gunderson

At The Fountain, we’re always pleased and excited to introduce important playwrights to Los Angeles audiences.  As we gear-up to start performances of our funny and powerful Los Angeles Premiere of I  And You,  we’re eager for you to meet award-winning playwright Lauren Gunderson. Audiences have been enjoying her plays in regional theatres around the country. Now Lauren makes her Los Angeles debut with us here at the Fountain. We couldn’t be more thrilled. 

Lauren Gunderson is the 2014 winner of the Steinberg/ATCA New Play award and was a finalist for the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize for I and You.  She studied Southern Literature and Drama at Emory University, and Dramatic Writing at NYU’s Tisch School where she was a Reynolds Fellow in Social Entrepreneurship. Her work has been commissioned, produced and developed at companies across the US including South Cost Rep (Emilie, Silent Sky), The Kennedy Center (The Amazing Adventures of Dr. Wonderful And Her Dog!), The O’Neill, Denver Center, Berkeley Rep, Shotgun Players, TheatreWorks, Crowded Fire, San Francisco Playhouse, Marin Theatre, Synchronicity, Olney Theatre, Geva and more.  Her work is published at Playscripts (I and You, Exit, Pursued By A Bear, and Toil And Trouble) and Samuel French (Emilie). She is a Playwright in Residence at The Playwrights Foundation, and a proud Dramatists Guild member. She is from Atlanta, GA and lives in San Francisco.

In her play  I And You,  two high-school teenagers who meet under extraordinary circumstances.  Caroline is sick and hasn’t been to school in months. Anthony suddenly arrives at her door bearing a beat-up copy of Walt Whitman’s ‘Leaves of Grass’ and an urgent assignment from their high school lit teacher. As these two let down their guards and share their secrets, the poetry assignment unlocks a much deeper mystery that has brought them together.

A Quick Chat with Lauren Gunderson

What is ‘I And You’ about?

This play is really about connection and the surprises we find when we really get to know people. In many ways it’s a Hero’s Journey but in miniature, so the heroes that we wouldn’t expect are two teenagers doing a project on Walt Whitman, but through a kind of, what might seem like a kind of vanilla assignment, blossoms this understanding and healing and a kind of transcendent communion that happens between these two unlikely heroes. So through that we found out about how we’re all connected to each other and life and death and meaning.

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock in "I And You"

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock in “I And You”

 What does this play mean to you?

This is a very special play for me because it reminds us that we’re all heroes and we’re all the main characters of our own stories even though we may seem not that in the privacy of our own homes, in this case, in Caroline’s teenage girl room. But from these really beautiful, profound, and private moments can come great stories, universal tales, about connection and meaning. That’s really where it stems from. I think that teenagers can teach us a lot, as much as we can teach them, so I hope that this is a play that finds some of its power in that teenagers can bring their parents and parents can bring their teens and everyone can come around this play and feel like it’s speaking to them and about them.

What was your inspiration behind all this?

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

Well I’ve always loved Walt Whitman— who doesn’t?—so it starts there. And I was really fascinated about how people find each other and how we impact each other in ways we don’t even know when we first meet. So that, spinning it all together with a bunch of surprises, a bunch of profound, funny moments, and really meaningful, deeper stuff, all weaving up into a play that’s about what we mean to each other. So in that way it’s a play I’ve been wanting to write for a long time, and through writing it, I’ve kind of changed how I know playwriting, how I tell a story, what a story is really about and what we want a story. so it’s changed me a lot through writing it, as much as I hope it’s changed people through seeing it.

Are there any similarities between you and these characters?

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

That’s a good question. I think there’s probably more similarity between Caroline and me than I would 11 like. But that’s what’s fun about writing, when you think about trying to write about really real characters, is you steal from yourself, you steal from your family and friends, you steal little details about life, and I think it’s those details that make it actually feel more universal. So Caroline likes cats a lot, she likes Jerry Lee Lewis, she likes Elvis, she has a very snarky attitude about things, but she’s very plugged in to herself. But in many ways I’m very like the other character, Anthony, too. I love jazz, he loves jazz. He kind of has a nerdy relationship to things that he’s passionate about, which I might relate to. But it’s really about really curious, smart, funny kids, and I think all of us hope that that part of ourselves is still alive and well no matter how old we get.

What do you hope audiences will get from this play?

I would love this community to get a sense that we’re all in one story together. Even though we might not think a 16- year-old has much to tell as 60-year old or a 50-year-old or a 40-year-old, of course they do, because we’re all human beings and we’re all looking for meaning, and we’re all looking to live a life that matters, a life of love and compassion and being understood. And those things don’t ever change, whether you’re six or 60. So I think that’s the biggest gift. It’s also an interesting thing to resuscitate Walt Whitman, not that he has any press problems, but when you look at a poem that’s over 150 years old and you find that it’s still relevant, I think it’s a metaphor for theatre as a whole. It’s an art form that’s so old and so basic, in a real fundamental way, still matters to us now, and can pull it together in one room and have on great cathartic experience together. I think that’s theatre at its best, and I hopefully this play is part of that tradition.

Previews start April 2nd. It opens April 11th. Get Tickets/More Info 

Fountain Theatre Honored With 13 Nominations for First Annual Stage Raw Theater Awards

The Brothers Size

‘Gilbert Glenn Brown and Matthew Hancock in ‘The Brothers Size’

Stage Raw today announced its first Stage Raw Los Angeles Theater Awards, honoring professional excellence in theaters of up to 99 seats for the 2014 calendar year.  The Fountain Theatre has been honored with 13 nominations:

  • Production of the Year – The Brothers Size Size Size
  • Direction – Stephen Sachs, My Name is Asher Lev 
  • Direction – Shirley Jo Finney, The Brothers Size Brothers Size
  • Ensemble – The Brothers Size
  • Supporting Actress –  Anna Khaja, My Name is Asher Lev
  • Supporting Actor – Joel Polis, My Name Is Asher Lev
  • Supporting Actor – Theodore Perkins, The Brothers Size
  • Solo Performance – Jenny O’Hara, Broomstick 
  • Original MusicPeter Bayne, The Brothers Size
  • Choreography – Ameenah Kaplan, The Brothers Size 
  • Adaptation – Aaron Posner, My Name Is Asher Lev 
  • Lighting Design – Pablo Santiago, The Brothers Size 
  • Production Design – Broomstick 

Full list of nominees

Stage Raw Award Night is April 13th at Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring Street, downtown Los Angeles. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., show starts at 7:30 p.m.

PHOTO SLIDESHOW: Q&A Talkback Discussion with Real Reborn Artists Highlights ‘Reborning’ Matinee

DSCN1898Are you curious about the people who create those lifelike reborn dolls? Why they do it? How they’re made? We hosted a fascinating Q&A discussion with reborn doll artists Amy Karich and LaJuana Hawkins following last Sunday’s matinee of Reborning by Zayd Dohrn.

Amy Karich is a professional Reborn artist based in Southern California. Her online nursery, Amy’s Dollhouse, can be found at www.amysdollhouse.com.  LaJuana Hawkins is a sculptor of African American figurines who has recently turned her talents to reborning.

In Zayd Dohrn’s play, currently receiving rave reviews in its Los Angeles premiere at the Fountain, a young reborn artist who crafts custom-made dolls tries to unravel the mystery surrounding a new client and, in the process, discovers the path to her own “reborning.” Starring Kristin Carey, Ryan Doucette and Joanna Strapp, and directed by Simon Levy, the Fountain Theatre’s production has been named a “Critic’s Choice” by the Los Angeles Times, which calls it an “exquisitely well-realized production … All the actors are rock-solid — a real heart-stopper.”

Enjoy These Snapshots from the Reborn Artist Q&A 

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More Info/Get Tickets

Want to Meet Two Real “Reborn” doll artists? Ask Questions? See ‘Reborning’ This Sunday, March 8th

Joanna Strapp in 'Reborning'

Joanna Strapp in ‘Reborning’

Amy Karich and LaJuana Hawkins to Q&A at Fountain Theatre

“Reborn” doll artists Amy Karich and LaJuana Hawkins will lead a discussion at the Fountain Theatre on Sunday, March 8 at 3:30 p.m., following the 2 p.m. matinee performance of Reborning by Zayd Dohrn.

A Reborn doll is a manufactured vinyl doll that has been transformed to resemble a human baby with as much realism as possible. Although many consumers collect Reborns as they would regular dolls, others use them to replace a child they once lost or a child that has grown up. The dolls often come with birth or adoption certificates, and their “parents” care for them as they would an infant. Because of their realistic appearance, Reborn dolls have occasionally been mistaken for real babies and rescued from parked cars after being reported to the police by passers-by.

Kristin Carey in "Reborning".

Kristin Carey in “Reborning”.

The doll design process — called Reborning — is elaborate and time-consuming. Creators hand-root each strand of hair onto a doll’s scalp. They replicate dewy newborn skin by adding up to 80 layers of paint to the vinyl molded baby, which then must be baked to be sealed. Some are then perfumed with new-baby smell. Manicured nails and opening of the nose holes, so that the baby can “breathe,” are other details that are added during the process. Reborn heads are often weighted, so that owners have to support the head like one would a real newborn. Electronic devices that mimic a heart beat, or make the chest rise and fall to simulate breathing are common. Reborns might come with an umbilical cord, baby fat, heat packs to make the reborn warm to the touch, or voice boxes that mimic infant sounds. Reborn dolls can be purchased on EBay and on artist websites, often called “nurseries.” Purchases are not called sales, but “adoptions.” There are trade shows for collectors nationwide. Depending on craftsmanship, dolls range in price from hundreds to thousands of dollars.

Amy Karich is a professional Reborn artist based in Southern California. Her online nursery, Amy’s Dollhouse, can be found at www.amysdollhouse.com.

LaJuana Hawkins is a sculptor of African American figurines who has recently turned her talents to Reborning.

In Zayd Dohrn’s play, currently receiving its Los Angeles premiere at the Fountain. a young artist who crafts custom-made dolls begins to suspect that a demanding client may be the mother who abandoned her at birth. As she tries to unravel the mystery, she discovers the path to her own “Reborning.” Starring Kristin Carey, Ryan Doucette and Joanna Strapp, and directed bySimon Levy, the Fountain Theatre’s production has been named a “Critic’s Choice” by the Los Angeles Times, which calls it an “exquisitely well-realized production… All the actors are rock-solid — a real heart-stopper.”

Get Tickets/More Info

Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell Speaks Out to Oppose AEA’s Referendum on LA’s 99-Seat Theatres

Councilmember Mitch O'Farrell speaks to the press in Hollywood.

Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell speaks to the press in Hollywood.

In a strong show of local government support to LA’s intimate theatre community, Los Angeles City Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell spoke out yesterday to oppose the controversial referendum proposed by Actors Equity Association (AEA) that would significantly alter the 99 Seat Theatre Plan, which has helped intimate theatres like the Fountain Theatre flourish in Los Angeles for at least three decades.  In the view of many Equity members and the LA theatre community, AEA’s referendum would severely diminish  the vibrant LA cultural landscape, reduce the opportunities of many of its own actor members, and impact local businesses citywide.

“Small theatre isn’t just about artistic expression,” said O’Farrell in his statement on the sidewalk of Hollywood’s Theatre Row. “It’s also good for the Los Angeles economy.” He also stated to the group of supporters, “99 seat theatre really built the theatre scene in LA.”

The Councilmember supports the surging ‘I Love 99‘ movement and its belief that artists have the right to perform in an intimate and non-commercial setting, if they so choose.

Actor Tim Robbins.

Actor Tim Robbins.

Also present were actors Tim Robbins, Noah Wyle, Deborah S. Craig, Adam Silver, Scott LowellRichard Azurdia, Frances Fisher, Parv Cheena, Jack Laufer, Angel ParkerKatie Lowes, Jane Kaczmarek and artistic directors Daniel Henning (The Blank Theatre), Martha Demson (Open Fist) and Stephen Sachs (The Fountain Theatre).

Stephen Sachs, Jack Laufer

Stephen Sachs, Parv Cheena, Jack Laufer, Adam Silver

Says Fountain Co-Artistic Director Stephen Sachs: “There’s a reason why it’s called non-profit theatre. This is about giving actors the freedom to create, the freedom to choose for themselves how and where they perform their craft.”

More info: www.Ilove99.org  On Twitter: #ilove99

The Surprise and Wonder of Human Connection in LA Premiere of ‘I And You’ at Fountain Theatre

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

“I and This Mystery, here we stand”
 Walt Whitman’s ‘Song of Myself

On the night before a class assignment is due, Caroline and Anthony plumb the mysteries of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass — unaware that a much deeper mystery has brought them together. The Los Angeles premiere  of I and You by Lauren Gunderson, winner of the 2014 Harold and Mimi Steinberg/American Theatre Critics Association New Play Award, opens onApril 11 at the Fountain Theatre, directed by Robin Larsen.

Only in high school would two completely unconnected people — feisty, chronically ill Caroline and levelheaded basketball star Anthony — be paired to collaborate on a project to deconstruct a poem about the interconnectivity of everything. Jennifer Finch (7 Redneck Cheerleaders and Hellcab with Elephant Theatre Company) and Matthew Hancock (Oshoosi in The Brothers Size at the Fountain) star as two smart and funny teens who share an unknown and profound bond.

“Whitman says that we are all one because we are all equal, even though it might not look like it at times. There is a universal oneness,” said Gunderson in an interview.

“These two precocious teenagers and Walt Whitman’s epic poem of humanity have something to teach us all,” says Larsen. “That we are supremely connected, to each other, to the earth, to the stars, and that recognizing this connection, becoming conscious of it, is perhaps the point of our existence.”

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

Jennifer Finch and Matthew Hancock

I and You was commissioned by South Coast Repertory (which also commissioned Gunderson’s Emilie: La Marquise Du Chaltelet Defends Her Life Tonight in 2009 and Silent Sky in 2011). The play received readings at SCR’s Pacific Playwrights Festival in April 2012 and as part of Magic Theatre’s new play development Magic @ the Costume Shop program. It premiered at the Marin Theatre Company in the fall of 2013, the first production in a series of “rolling world premieres” made possible by the National New Play Network’s Continued Life of New Plays Fund; subsequent NNPN productions took place at the Olney Theatre Center in Olney, Maryland and the Phoenix Theatre in Indianapolis, Indiana. I and You went on to win the 2014 Harold and Mimi Steinberg/American Theatre Critics Association New Play Award and was a finalist for the 2014 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize. American Theatre magazine put it on the cover of its July/August 2014 issue and featured the script in its entirety.

Playwright Lauren Gunderson

Playwright Lauren Gunderson

Lauren Gunderson studied Southern literature and drama at Emory University, and dramatic writing at NYU’s Tisch School where she was a Reynolds Fellow in Social Entrepreneurship. Her work has been commissioned, produced and developed at companies across the U.S. including South Coast Rep (Emilie, Silent Sky), the Kennedy Center (The Amazing Adventures of Dr. Wonderful And Her Dog!), the O’Neill, Denver Center, Berkeley Rep, Shotgun Players, TheatreWorks, Crowded Fire, San Francisco Playhouse, Marin Theatre, Synchronicity, Olney Theatre, Geva and more. Her work is published at Playscripts (I and You, Exit, Pursued By A Bear andToil And Trouble) and Samuel French (Emilie). She is a playwright-in-residence at the Playwrights Foundation and a member of the Dramatists Guild. Originally from Atlanta, GA, Gunderson lives in San Francisco.

Robin Larsen

Robin Larsen

Robin Larsen has been chosen to receive the 2015 Milton Katselas Award for Career Achievement in Direction by the Los Angeles Drama Critic’s Circle, to be presented at the LADCC awards ceremony on March 16, and the production of A Delicate Balance that she directed for Odyssey Theatre Ensemble is a current nominee for the circle’s McCulloh Award for Revival. Other directing credits include Mrs. Warren’s Profession at Antaeus; the L.A. premiere of David Harrower’s Blackbird for Rogue Machine (LADCC nomination, Best Production; five “Best of 2011” lists including the Los Angeles Times and LA Weekly); the world premiere of Pursued By Happiness by Keith Huff at the Road Theatre Company (Los Angeles Times “Critic’s Choice”); and the West Coast premiere of The Fall To Earth by Joel Drake Johnson, starring JoBeth Williams, at the Odyssey (LADCC Nomination, Huffington Post “2012 Top Los Angeles Theater Productions”). Robin’s West Coast premiere of Four Places, also by Joel Johnson, at Rogue Machine was one of the most lauded plays of the 2010 L.A. theater season, winning Ovation, LADCC and Backstage Garland awards for Best Production. For the Black Dahlia Theatre, Robin directed the West Coast premiere of Tryst (five Ovation Award nominations including Best Production and Best Director, three LA Weekly Awards including Best Play, and two Backstage Garland Awards including Best Director) and the L.A. premiere of David Schulner’s An Infinite Ache (Los Angeles Times “Critic’s Choice”). Robin is an Academy Award-winning filmmaker whose work has screened at festivals around the world. Her web series Sex & Marriage, created with playwright John Pollono, can be seen on Justin Lin’s YouTube network YOMYOMF.

Set design for I and You is by Tom Buderwitz; lighting design is by Jeremy Pivnick; sound design is by John Zalewski; costume design is by Jocelyn Hublau Parker; production stage manager is Josephine Austin; associate producer is James Bennett; and Stephen Sachs, Deborah Lawlor and Simon Levy produce for the Fountain Theatre.

Currently celebrating its 25th anniversary, The Fountain Theatre is one of the most successful intimate theaters in Los Angeles, providing a creative home for multi-ethnic theater and dance artists. The Fountain has won over 225 awards, and Fountain projects have been seen across the U.S. and internationally. Recent highlights include being honored with the 2014 Ovation Award for Best Season and the 2014 BEST Award for overall excellence from the Biller Foundation; the Fountain play Bakersfield Mist in London’s West End starring Kathleen Turner and Ian McDiarmid; the sold-out Forever Flamenco gala concert at the 1200-seat John Anson Ford Amphitheatre; and the last four Fountain productions consecutively highlighted as Critic’s Choice in the Los Angeles Times. The Fountain has been honored with six Awards of Excellence from the Los Angeles City Council for “enhancing the cultural life of Los Angeles.”

production photos by Ed Krieger

I And You April 2 – June 14 (323) 663-1525  MORE/Get Tickets