NOW CASTING: World Premiere of ‘Dream Catcher’ by Stephen Sachs, directed by Cameron Watson

mojave_desert_4-8-11_50d_083The Fountain Theatre is now casting and holding auditions for the world premiere of Dream Catcher by Stephen Sachs, directed by Cameron Watson. The new play will open January 23rd, launching the Fountain’s 2016 season.


Inspired by a true event. Solar power confronts spirit power in this new drama about climate change, cultural change and the moral consequences of personal choice. Roy is the youngest member on a team of high-level engineers brought in to launch the most important project of his young career: the construction of a solar energy plant in the middle of the Mojave desert. But Roy suddenly finds himself thrust into the center of a crisis when the discovery of long-buried Native American artifacts threaten to bring the billion-dollar operation to a halt. The disaster gets deeply personal when the whistle-blower turns out to be Opal, the fiery and unpredictable young Mojave Indian woman with whom Roy has been having an affair.


Female, 20’s, Mojave Indian. Tough, edgy, bold, sensual, fiery “Rez chick”. Passionate, wild, unpredictable, powerful, foul-mouthed, speaks her mind. Under-educated but world-wise, smarter than she looks. Burns for love and a better life but feels unworthy of both. A fighter, a survivor, she suddenly finds herself thrust into a turning point that could change her life path. Seeking a strong, skilled powerful Native American stage actress with a very wide range and a deep emotional well.
Male, 30’s, solar power engineer. Clean-cut, nice-looking, WASP New Englander. Well educated, articulate, logical, science-minded. Aches with ambition and the need to be seen and approved by his colleagues. The Genesis power plant is his life-or-death opportunity to make a name for himself. His driving ambition blinds him to the painful truth about himself. His fierce desire for success hides a sad, inner loneliness. Seeking a strong, skilled powerful stage actor with a very wide range and a deep emotional well.
  • Auditions start December 2nd, 2015
  • Rehearsals start on/about December 14, 2015
  • Previews January 16 – 22, 2016
  • Opens January 23 – March 14, 2016

CONTRACT/RATE: AEA 99-Seat Transitional, $25 per performance plus $200 rehearsal stipend. Non-union permitted.

Submit headshot & resume to:

Multiple award-winner Stephen Sachs is the author of twelve plays including such Fountain productions as Citizen: An American Lyric (adaptor), Bakersfield Mist, Cyrano, Heart SongMiss Julie: Freedom Summer, Sweet Nothing in my Ear and Central Avenue.

Heralded by The Los Angeles Times as “one of our finest contemporary directors,” Cameron Watson has earned critical acclaim for recently directing Picnic and Top Girls at Antaeus Theatre Company, Cock at Rogue Machine Theatre, and Trying at The Colony Theatre starring Alan Mandell.

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Lexi’s Intern Journal: Theatre Bringing People Together

Lexi Lallatin leads class lesson on Outsider Art.

Lexi Lallatin leads class lesson on Outsider Art.

by Lexi Lallatin

One of the great things about working in a theatre is you get the opportunity to bring people together.

Theater starts the minute the lights go down and the outside world stops. In the darkened theater, the to-do lists and personal hardships fade into a different world that will be yours for the next two hours. In the dark, we are no longer different people but a collective group sharing the same experience. We taste the love Romeo has for Juliet, cry with John Proctor as he asks for forgiveness, and laugh with Eliza Doolittle as she dances all night. Theatre lets us reexperience first kisses, our first heartaches. It evens the playing field so we all can experience the same thing regardless of how different we are. As we experienced it with our last production, Citizen: An American Lyric. In the dark we were the oppressed and the oppressor. We became a collective unit attempting to understand racism.

But Friday, we got to experience a very different type of unifying. Friday we were able to have Eric Arboleda’s third grade class from Ramona Elementary School come to our theatre. And we stopped being actors and children and started becoming one collective unit.

Lexi Lallatin leading clasas lesson on stage.

Lexi Lallatin holding photo of Nukain Mabuza to students.

We started the day with a tour of the theatre which ended on the stage set up for our show The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek. There, surrounded by intricately designed rocks, sand, and a set we were able to discuss found art- particularly relating to Nukain Mabuza (The subject of the play). The children were able to see through the eyes of someone who lived during the apartheid. They talked about how they would have wanted to “express their emotions”. And once again, it testified to the unifying power of theatre. Where else would third grade children and theatre artists be able to bond over the artistic genius of an untrained artist during apartheid in South Africa? In the end, the kids were able to express themselves independently by painting their own rocks.

Lexi lallatin with Ramona School student on the set of 'Painted Rocks".

Lexi lallatin with Ramona School student on the set of ‘Painted Rocks”.

I speak for the Fountain Theatre when I say that this experience spoke to us on why we do theater. Theatre has the power to unify. To bring together. Every child was different. Some were too shy to speak and others couldn’t wait to tell you every detail of their day. Some spent the whole time making sure their rock was perfect, while others were more eager to get to the doughnut and play “duck, duck, goose”. Every rock came out different. Some were intricate, with dots and swirls. Some were blobs of a color the child swore was “marbled.” But in the end, all of the students were so excited to share and talk about their rocks.

I am so thankful for the wonderful Ramona Elementary School, to Eric Arboleda and his wonderful class, to American Builders Supply in Pacoima who donated the rocks, to Stan’s Doughnuts, and to all the people at the theatre who helped make this possible. This is the epitome of bringing people together. We are so thankful to be part of this community, and we are proud to say this is the type of thing we strive for.

Students from Ramona Elementary School.

Students from Ramona Elementary School.

Come to the Fountain Theatre and see The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek. Be part of the shared experience. See the children’s rocks in our lobby. Hear about Nukain Mabuza. On Friday, as the sun set on our collection of wet rocks drying in the sun, each with its own story behind it, I wondered what Nukain would have thought if he knew all the different people he brought together, on Friday and throughout therun of this play, to pay homage to his memory and his work.

Lexi Lallatin is from Portland, Oregon, and now an  intern at the Fountain Theatre. The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek runs to December 14th.  Info/Tickets

3rd graders enjoy artistic expression on ‘Painted Rocks Day’ at Fountain Theatre

SAM_0563Students from our neighborhood Ramona Elementary School on Mariposa Street only had to walk around the corner to experience a unforgettable  day of creativity, fun and artistic expression at the Fountain Theatre. The kids joined Fountain staff for ‘Painted Rocks Day’, a community arts event inviting the students to visit the theatre, learn about Outsider Art and rock painting, then choose and paint their own smooth rocks to express their world view and inner selves.

The educational activity was a satellite event of the Fountain Theatre’s west coast premiere of Athol Fugard’s The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek, dramatizing the life and vision of South African artist Nuzain Mabuza who painted hundreds of rocks on a hillside in bright colors and patterns to create his visionary “flower garden” .

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Led by teacher Eric Arboleda, the twenty-four 3rd graders arrived Friday morning and were given tours of the Fountain Theatre by staff members. The group was shown the remarkable ‘Painted Rocks’ set on the main stage, complete with real dirt, plants and a vibrant collection of painted rocks and boulders. 

Fountain intern Lexi Lallatin lead the class in a lesson discussing examples of Outsider Art and how art can be created by ordinary found objects. Lexi shared the story of Nuzain Mabuza and encouraged the students to imagine how they might transform everyday objects in their daily lives into magical art pieces.

The group then moved outside to the Fountain parking lot where a long art table holding rocks, paints and brushes was waiting. The students excitedly dove in and went to work. Each chose their own rock and were told to paint it however they wished, with as many colors and patterns they imagined, to express who they were and their own inner vision.  

The results were extraordinary. Simple gray stones were transformed into vibrant talismen of color and bright patterns.   The students thoroughly enjoyed themselves. They painted, laughed and chatted excitedly as they worked for one hour. Donuts and juice were served.  

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The rocks painted by the students will remain on display in the lobby of the Fountain Theatre throughout the run of The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek to December 14th. At that time, the rocks will then be given to the students to take home.   

We wish to thank American Builders Supply in Pacoima for donating the rocks for the students to paint, and Stan’s Doughnuts for the snacks. A shout-out to Fountain staff members Lexi Lallatin, James Bennett, Scott Tuomey, and Barbara Goodhill for helping to make the event a joyous success.   

‘Painted Rocks Day’ with Ramona Elementary School was created through Theatre As a Learning Tool, the Fountain Theatre’s educational outreach program dedicated to making art accessible to students and young people in Los Angeles.      

The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek is now playing and runs to December 14th. More Info/Get Tickets 

Gilbert Glenn Brown paints a picture in new Athol Fugard play at the Fountain Theatre

Gilbert Glenn Brown and Suanne Spoke in 'The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek'

Gilbert Glenn Brown and Suanne Spoke in ‘The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek’

by Darlene Donloe

The name Gilbert Glenn Brown has become synonymous with “good works” around the L.A. theater world.

A handsome gent with a bright, poetic smile, Brown enjoys a career that has spanned film, television and theater. His theatrical credits are extensive, and the list of directors and actors that he’s shared a stage with reads like a Who’s Who of Los Angeles theater.

On this particular day, as the sun is setting after an extremely warm afternoon, Brown is sitting on the upstairs patio of the Fountain Theater, dapper in a gray cap, blue-and-white rolled up checkered shirt and gray vest. He’s ready to talk about the actor’s life that he’s carved out.

Known for bringing all of himself—and none of himself—to his roles, Brown has delivered a number of stellar performances, playing vivid and memorable characters that have earned him the COLSAC Best Lead Performance Award, two Los Angeles Drama Critics Awards and an LA Weekly Award.

He made women swoon and men suck in their guts delivering an arousing performance as Shango, the neighborhood bad boy in Tarell Alvin McCraney’s original comedy/drama, In The Red and Brown Water, directed by Shirley Jo Finney. He was the intense and absorbing older brother Ogun Size in McCraney’s The Brothers Size, also directed by Finney. Most recently, he was probably the most sensually-charged Polyneices ever to grace a stage in the Ebony Repertory Theatre’s The Gospel At Colonus.

Now the Brooklyn native is set to play Jonathan in the West Coast premiere of Athol Fugard’s latest play, The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek, a drama directed by Simon Levy, now playing at the Fountain Theatre in Hollywood.

Gilbert Glenn Brown and Suanne Spoke

Gilbert Glenn Brown and Suanne Spoke

This production marks the Fountain Theatre’s 15-year relationship with the playwright that began in 2000 when Fountain Co-Artistic Director Stephen Sachs directed Fugard’s The Road to Mecca. It was then that Fugard, an Academy Award winner for Tsotsi (Best Foreign Language Film), recipient of the 2011 Tony for lifetime achievement—and a multiple Obie and Tony Award-winner best known for his plays rooted in the scars of South African apartheid—reportedly began to call the Fountain his “artistic home on the West Coast.”

The Play

Inspired by the work of real-life outsider artist Nukain Mabuza, The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek is set in South Africa in the 1980s. It tells the story of elderly Nukain, a farm worker and self-taught artist who has spent years painting the rocks and boulders at Revolver Creek, transforming them into a garden of flowers.

The play, which also stars Thomas Silcott, Philip Solomon and Suanne Spoke, begins when the final, most challenging unpainted stone and a young boy named Bokkie (Nukain’s assistant) “force Nukain to confront his legacy as both an artist and a black man in 1980s South Africa,” where the horrible injustices of apartheid still prevailed at the time—dividing the country into black and white.

The minute he read the script, Brown jumped at the chance to play Jonathan, the grown-up version of Bokkie, who returns to Revolver Creek to restore the faded rocks as a tribute to Nukain, the friend he loved.

“What I like about Jonathan is the need he feels to come back and stand up for someone he loves,” says Brown. “He comes back to stand up for someone who wasn’t able to stand up and say I’m a man, or say that he mattered.”

Although he’s a “huge fan” of the playwright, this is the first time that Brown has tackled an Athol Fugard play. “I am familiar with his activism,” Brown says, “and using theater as a means of activism. I was groomed, in a sense, to look at issues head on. It’s about telling the truth with the material. I read the play and I was blown away by it because of the honesty of the material.”

“What’s wonderful about Gilbert,” says Simon Levy, who is directing the show, “is that he’s this beautiful combination of sensitivity and danger,” says Levy. “He possesses a deep well of emotion that reveals itself in surprising ways so that the character always feels kinetic and honest.”

“I think I understand where Simon wants to go with this piece,” Brown says. “He’s very clear on making sure that the audience can connect with the story and with the living, breathing human beings—not in a superficial way. It’s a wonderfully written piece.”

Brown is working with a dialect coach to get Jonathan’s South African accent right. “I want to honor the person I’m portraying [and] the people who actually speak that language…and be so connected, that I don’t think it’s an accent, it’s just how I speak.”

Now that Brown has had several weeks to ingest the material, he’s gained more insight into the meaning and intent of Fugard’s words. Comments from a documentary on apartheid that Brown watched as research added to his understanding:

“An activist said apartheid not only jails the people that are oppressed,” Brown recalls, “but also the jailers because they are caught in a cycle. You become dehumanized when you think someone is not as much as you are. Until you can say this happened, and acknowledge that it happened, there will be no movement. The people affected are not going to let it go. I realize now that it’s an opportunity to see each other as human beings.

“That is what the play means to me,” Brown says. “I’m always looking for truth.”  Continue reading

Fountain Theatre welcomes new board member Donald L. Zachary

Donald and Suzanne Zachary

Donald and Suzanne Zachary

The Fountain Theatre proudly welcomes attorney Donald L. Zachary to its Board of Directors.

Donald L Zachary maintains an intellectual property, transactional business and litigation practice in Los Angeles. He uses his extensive experience in connection with news and entertainment matters, particularly with respect to copyrights and trademarks, to construct business relationships and negotiate agreements for individuals and businesses.

With over 40 years of experience on both coasts in federal and state courts and as a former Vice President, Law, West Coast for NBC, Don has extensive experience in entertainment and communications law involving production companies, news outlets and talent in the areas of television, feature films and publishing.

Don’s litigation practice involves representing plaintiffs and defendants incomplex business, intellectual property, entertainment and communications lawsuits in both state and federal courts, as well as in connection with arbitration and mediation.

Since 2007, Don has been selected as one of Southern California’s Best Lawyers® in the area of intellectual property law by ALM Magazine. Don also has been designated by U.S. News® and Best Lawyers® as a 2014 Tier 3 Best Law Firm and as a Tier 2 Best Law Firm in California.

Don was chosen by the Greater Los Angeles chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists to receive their Freedom of Information Award for 2012. At their annual Golden Mike Awards banquet that same year, the Radio & Television News Association of Southern California recognized Don as a person “making a difference in broadcast journalism” in recognition of his years of service to RTNA and the broadcast community.

Don and his wife Suzanne have been longtime members of our Fountain Family. We are thrilled to have Don join our Board of Directors.

Woman confronted for reading ‘Citizen: An American Lyric’ at Donald Trump rally

woman at Donald Trump rally

See the woman in the upper right corner of this photo?

On Monday, Donald Trump spent an hour in Springfield, Illinois, speaking to a crowd of supporters. And one defiant woman sitting directly behind him. She was obviously paid to be there. They didn’t pay her to listen.

The woman spent much of the rally chatting with the companion next to her, texting and checking her phone, determined to read the paperback book in her hand. And guess which book she was brazenly reading?

Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine. The internationally acclaimed and award-winning collection of poetry on racism in America that was adapted by Stephen Sachs  into a sold-out stage phenomenon this summer at the Fountain Theatre directed by Shirley Jo Finney.

Reading ‘Citizen’ at the Trump rally led to a confrontation between the woman and an avid Trump supporter. This video was caught by Vic Berger.

We don’t know who the woman is. We just hope she starts a book club.

PHOTO SLIDESHOW: Artists and Audiences Celebrate at Opening Night Party of ‘The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek’

Maya Lynn Robinson and Gilbert Glenn Brown

Maya Lynn Robinson and Gilbert Glenn Brown

Cast, company and audience members swept into our upstairs cafe Saturday night to celebrate the opening night performance of our west coast premiere of Athol Fugard’s new play, The Painted Rocks at Revolver Creek. Food, drink and joyfulness followed a marvelous performance that earned a standing ovation.

Internationally acclaimed playwright Athol Fugard returns to the Fountain Theatre with this beautifully heartfelt new drama. Directed by Simon Levy, it features Gilbert Glenn Brown, Thomas Silcott, Philip Solomon, and Suanne Spoke.

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The production runs to December 14th. Info/Get Tickets