Category Archives: grants

Now Hiring: paid summer internship for college student at the Fountain Theatre

artworxLA 2017 intern group

A peer group of 2016 LA County interns.

Know a college student looking for a paying job this summer? A young person who likes theatre and enjoys working in a crazy, eccentric theatrical environment? Search no further. The Fountain is the place.

The Fountain Theatre is now accepting applications to hire one college student as a Production Intern for 10 consecutive weeks this summer, commencing sometime between June 5, 2017 and ending August 25, 2017.  It is a full-time position (40 hours per week for 10 weeks) with a salary of $480 per week.  

The Production Intern will receive valuable on-the-job training and professional experience by fully engaging in all production facets of the Fountain Theatre. The intern will work alongside the Fountain’s Artistic Directors and professional producers in all elements of event production including administration and planning, artist outreach, vendor support, technical coordination, marketing, publicity, and social media. The intern will serve as production assistant to plays produced on the Fountain main stage and its outdoor flamenco concert.

The intern candidate must have basic computer and word-processing skills (PC, Word, Excel, Internet), good communication skills and pleasant phone manner, organizational skills, be detail oriented, and have the ability to multi-task in an intimate office environment. A sense of humor and a willingness to learn many aspects of production. S/he should be self-motivated and have the ability to take initiative when required. S/he should also have a passion for theater. Excellent writing and editing skills. An ability to work effectively both independently and cooperatively. Creativity, enthusiasm for learning, and an outgoing, friendly demeanor. Looking for an individual who can wear many hats and interested in learning and performing a variety of production duties, often at the same time.

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors established the Arts Internship Program to provide undergraduate students with meaningful on-the-job training and experience in working in nonprofit arts organizations, while assisting arts organizations to develop future arts leaders. This is our sixth year participating in the program and we’ve had great luck with our summer interns. Each one has been incredibly helpful, has learned a great deal, and became part of our Fountain Family. We are still in contact with all of them.

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This internship position is open to currently enrolled undergraduate (2- or 4-year) college students who reside or attend college in Los Angeles County. Students must have completed at least one semester of college by June 1, 2017, or will complete their undergraduate degree between May 1 – September 1, 2017 in order to participate.  Students must be able to legally work in the United States. 

To apply, please email Stephen Sachs at: stephen@fountaintheatre.com

Deadline to apply is Friday, April 28.

Fountain Theatre Awarded Grant from the Shubert Foundation

FT April 1 2016

The Fountain Theatre has been awarded a grant from The Shubert Foundation in the amount of $10,000 for general operating support. This is the first grant award from the Shubert Foundation received by the Fountain in its 26-year history.

“We’re honored and delighted,” said Fountain Co-Artistic Director Stephen Sachs. “The Shubert Foundation is the nation’s largest private foundation dedicated to supporting non-profit arts organizations, particularly theatres. We are deeply grateful for their commitment.”     

The Shubert Foundation provides grants to theatre organizations that have an established artistic and administrative track record, as well as a history of fiscal responsibility. The standard for awarding these grants is based on an assessment of each organization’s operation and its contribution to the field. Artistic achievement, administrative strength and fiscal stability are factored into each evaluation, as is the company’s development of new work and other significant contributions to the field of professional theatre in the United States.

“Thanks to our Development Director, Barbara Goodhill, we’ve increased our grant support and overall fundraising effort over the past two years,” says Sachs. “We plan to further our relationship with the Shubert Foundation and other grant-giving organizations as we continue to move forward.”

Now Hiring: paid summer internship at the Fountain Theatre

 

ft-intern-group-hugKnow a college student looking for a paying job this summer? A young person who likes theatre and enjoys working in a crazy, eccentric theatrical environment? Search no further. The Fountain is the place.

The Fountain Theatre is now accepting applications to hire one Development Intern for 10 weeks this summer between  June 6 – August 26. It is a full-time position (40 hours per week for 10 weeks) that pays $420 per week.   

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors established the Arts Internship Program to provide undergraduate students with meaningful on-the-job training and experience in working in nonprofit arts organizations, while assisting arts organizations to develop future arts leaders. This is our fifth year participating in the program and we’ve had great luck with our summer interns. Each one has been incredibly helpful, has learned a great deal, and became part of our Fountain Family. We are still in contact with all of them.

lowes-final-party 2013

2013 intern Lowes Moore and Fountain Family.

 Student eligibility for internship positions is limited to currently enrolled undergraduate college students who reside or attend college in Los Angeles County. Students must have completed at least one semester of college by June 1, 2016 or will complete their undergraduate degree between May 1 – September 1, 2016 in order to be eligible to participate. Students who have already earned a BA, BS or a higher degree are not eligible.

The Development Intern will receive valuable on-the-job training and professional experience in researching, writing, and submitting grant proposals to foundations and other funding organizations. The intern will assist in targeting and contacting new funding sources, creating and implementing new fundraising materials, and facilitate special events for donors and community partners.

The intern candidate must have basic computer and word-processing skills (PC, Word, Excel, Internet), good communications skills and pleasant phone manner, organizational skills, be detailed oriented, and have the ability to multi-task in an intimate office environment. A sense of humor and a willingness to learn many aspects of theatre management. She/he should be self-motivated and have the ability to take initiative when required. She/he should also have a passion for theatre. Excellent writing and editing skills. An ability to work effectively both independently and cooperatively. Creativity, enthusiasm for learning, and an outgoing friendly demeanor. 

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To apply, please email cover letter and resume to Stephen Sachs at stephen@fountaintheatre.com

This internship is sponsored by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors through the Los Angeles County Arts Commission.  132 undergraduate interns will participate in the program this year at more than 100 performing, presenting, and literary nonprofit arts organizations and municipal arts agencies throughout LA County.  In addition to their full-time 10 week paid internship, interns will participate in educational events as part of the program, which is funded by the Getty Foundation.  The educational events are designed to provide interns with a broader perspective of the vibrant arts and cultural landscape of the County.  For additional information on the Los Angeles County Arts Commission, the Arts Internship Program, and for a complete list of all the internships offered this summer, visit the Arts Commission website at www.lacountyarts.org.

Fountain Theatre Awarded Grant to Create, Develop and Produce a New Play in 2015

Simon Levy, Stephen Sachs, Barbara Goodhill and Deborah Lawlor

Fountain Team: Simon Levy, Stephen Sachs, Barbara Goodhill and Deborah Lawlor

The Fountain Theatre has been awarded a grant from the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs in the amount of $6,840 for the purpose of creating, developing and producing a new play in 2014-15. 

Since its founding in 1980, the acclaimed Fountain Theatre has been dedicated to creating and producing new plays that reflect the cultural diversity of Los Angeles and the nation. In twenty-four years of public service, the Fountain Theatre has presented over 100 productions of plays including 32 world premieres and 43 U.S./Regional premieres. 

Los Angeles City Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell hailed the grant. “Thank you for your administrative diligence and artistic vision in providing Los Angeles residents with affordable, unique, and exciting opportunities.”  

“We deeply appreciate the years of ongoing support provided to the Fountain by the City of Los Angeles, ” beamed Co-Artistic Director Stephen Sachs. “Mayor Eric Garcetti was our former Councilmember and he remains a good friend of the Fountain.”  

Stephen Sachs and Deborah Lawlor with LA Mayor Eric Garcetti

Stephen Sachs and Deborah Lawlor with LA Mayor Eric Garcetti

The grant from the City of Los Angeles will support the creation and production of a new play at the Fountain Theatre in 2015. The coming year also happens to be the Fountain’s 25th Anniversary Season.  

Fountain Theatre Awarded $10,000 NEA Grant

Freddy Herko

Freddie Herko

The Fountain Theatre is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in the amount of $10,000 to support the creation, development and presentation of Freddiean original new play utilizing a collaborative fusion of music, video, dance and drama. The world premiere project created by Fountain Co-Artistic Director Deborah Lawlor will be a thrilling hybrid of performance and video art forms to tell the unforgettable true story of Frederick Herko, the young avant garde dancer who galvanized audiences and those who knew him in New York’s East Village during the turbulent 1960’s.

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol

A dazzling storm of charisma, beauty and artistic passion, Herko was a brilliant 28 year-old dancer of extraordinary talent haunted by dark self-destructive demons. A fiery denizen of Andy Warhol’s Factory and the experimental scene in Greenwich Village, Herko became more eccentric, unpredictable and self-destructive. In 1964, while dancing in his apartment to Mozart’s Coronation Mass, Herko leapt out the window and fell to his death five stories down. Created by Deborah Lawlor, who was a close friend of Herko in the final year of his life, the project chronicles the blazing comet of the Icarus-like Freddie and the explosive creative energy of the 1960’s. By fusing theatre, music, dance and video collage, the project will capture the explosive spirit of a passionate artist and a turbulent era.

Freddy Herko

Freddie Herko

Deborah Lawlor

Deborah Lawlor

The biography of Freddie Herko is currently being researched and written by Gerard Forde, a friend of Deborah Lawlor. Forde is now hosting a screening at the Museum of Modern Art in New York of Andy Warhol films featuring Herko.

The world premiere of Deborah Lawlor’s exciting Freddie project will be presented at the Fountain in 2015. 

Change Is Not Always a Measure of Success

change-simon-wordle-24

“I come to bury innovation not to praise it.”

by Todd London

Todd London

Todd London

I’m reading Dave Eggers’ new novel, The Circle. It takes place inside a Google-like company by the same name. As the book begins, the Circle’s latest hire, Mae, tours the sparkling, communitarian campus, “400 acres of brushed steel and glass.” “It’s heaven,” she thinks.

The walkway wound around lemon and orange trees and its quiet red cobblestones were replaced, occasionally, by tiles with imploring messages of inspiration. ‘Dream,’ one said, the word laser-cut into the red stone. ‘Participate,’ said another.

There are dozens of these word-bricks, but Eggers just names a few: “Find Community.” “Imagine.” “Breathe.” And yes, you guessed it, “Innovate.”

You know where this is going. It’s not heaven at all. It’s Orwellian hell, Steve Jobs meets L. Ron Hubbard. The people are warm, brilliant, and aglow with a perfectly modulated passion, like those shiny charismatics who dominate the Ted Talks. In other words, Eggers novel describes something like the Platonic ideal of a 24/7 “innovation summit.” It’s a nightmare.

New Dramatists, New York

New Dramatists, New York

I’m a writer and I live and work with writers. The stone steps to the old Midtown Manhattan church that houses New Dramatists don’t have words etched in them. No one needs to be told to imagine or, since they’re with us for seven-year residencies, to find community. The domed window above the wooden entrance doors does have words, painted in gold: Dedicated to the Playwright. That’s all. We dedicate our service to their efforts and, because art leads change and not the other way around, their work cuts a slow path to the new.

Most of us there—writers, staff, board—swing between incredulity and fury at the rampant spread of this innovation obsession in the arts. So I have to confess: I come to bury innovation not to praise it.

Here’s how the siren call of innovation sounds from our church: It signals another incursion on the arts by corporate culture, directive funders, and those who have drunk the Kool-Aid of high-tech hip and devotional entrepreneurism. It announces the rise of a cult of consultancy, already a solid wing of the funding community. One New York foundation, which formerly gave out sizable general operating support, now requires each grantee to send two senior staffers to spend several mornings at the feet of turnaround king Michael Kaiser, as a prerequisite for payment and any future funding. You follow? They hire a high-paid macher to teach us how to fundraise even as they stop funding us.

The world is changing radically and so must we. That’s the agenda underlying the innovation mandate. This change agenda is actually a critique, a presumption that arts organizations are calcified, failed. Of course, most of us share this critique and believe it’s true of every company but our own. More, it implies that our companies, many five or six decades old, don’t know how to adapt.

It’s not that we’ve failed to adapt; we have adapted and adapted, twisting our adaptive muscles into shapes for this funding trend or that initiative, for the new, improved, think it, do it, be it, say it, better believe it world of organizational reorganization until we’re blue in the core values. We have lost sight of the ocean, in which we may be sinking, and keep returning to the mechanism of the boat.

Where innovation thinkers see ill-adaptive organizations, I see decades of unsupported art and artists, energy and money thrown at institutional issues, as if this can make the art relevant. I’d suggest it’s the funding community that needs to take a deep, humble look at its assumptions and, most urgently, at the human relations and power dynamics of money and expertise. Doctor, please innovate thyself.

Change is no measure of success. Do we do what we say we do? Do we do it well? If we don’t, we shouldn’t be funded. If we are worthy of funding, we have proved we’re capable of self-determination.

So why did New Dramatists attend an “innovation summit,” if this is all so wrongheaded, and why did we apply to EmcArts Innovation Lab? It’s simple. Funding and learning, in that order. We’re as desperate for new funding as the next guy. We’ve been known to pretzel our priorities to get some. The Lab came with money; the summit with a roomful of important funders. Can we admit this? Both have brought us new colleagues and new insights.   Continue reading

Jessica’s Journal: Goodbye for Now

by Jessica Broutt

Let me start my last blog post of the summer by saying that I am not a big fan of change.  I love re-reading books, seeing movies over and over, and staying friends with people who I have known a long time.  I find sameness very comforting.  And now, after sitting at the same desk and showing up to work at the same time for the last ten weeks, tomorrow will be my last day at The Fountain.

Obviously, this being my last day makes me very sad because I love everything about this theatre.  I love driving to The Fountain on the 101 and passing Capitol Records because I always feel like I’m in a movie about living in Los Angeles.  I love the fact that The Fountain Theatre is not only on Fountain Avenue but there is an actual fountain in the parking lot. I love knowing that no matter what time I come in Scott will always be in the office before me.  I love sitting at my pink desk and waiting for my computer to load.  I love that when Stephen comes in he always comes to my desk to say hello.  I love that Diana thinks I’m a computer genius because I know how to hit the refresh button.  I love that our bathroom has a bathtub. I love that after 10 weeks I finally know how to use our printer. I love that James pretended like I wasn’t a complete idiot when it took me a considerable amount of time to figure out how to use the printer in question. I love saying hello to Deborah as she comes in and saying goodbye to Simon when I leave.  And I really love writing grants and blogs and e-mails, and whatever else I’m asked to do. But what these little things really mean when you put them all together is that I just love working at The Fountain.

I know I have said this in most all of my blog posts, but being an intern here really has been incredible.  And while I was partly surprised that it has been so wonderful, a part of me knew that it would be from the moment I got the job.  After a phone interview with Stephen, I was asked to come in for a face to face interview with Simon, Stephen, and Deborah.  I came in and thought it went really well and was waiting to hear Stephen offer me the job. But that didn’t happen.  I drove away thinking that it must have not gone as well as I’d thought.  Then, about 5 minutes after I had pulled out of the lot I got a call from Stephen, first chastising me for answering the phone while I was driving, and after clarifying that I had blue tooth, he said, “We talked it over and decided that you’re hired.” Right then I knew that any person that would call me five minutes after I left and then question why I would answer the phone while I was driving, was the kind of person I would be happy to work with.  And I’ve been so happy these past 10 weeks.  I have been spoiled for any other organization because now I know what being an intern should be like, and I can’t wait for my next opportunity to come back.

So while change is not something I’ve ever been too fond of, starting at the Fountain was the best change I’ve ever experienced.  And now I can tell you first hand that not only is the Fountain Theatre intimate and excellent because of its space and the theatre produced here, but because of the people who work here as well.

Jessica Broutt is our summer intern from UC San Diego. We thank the LA County Arts Commission and its Arts Internship Program for its support.